Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears. Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. Caesar had been assassinated by a group of conspirators led by Brutus.

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; 2. If it were so, it was a grievous fault, And grievously hath Caesar answered it. The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interred with their bones. The crowd cheers Brutus on, wishing him to be the new Caesar.

So let it be with Caesar. Caesar cannot believe his friend participated in his assassination. So let it be with Caesar. Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears. The remark was an even greater irony in that he did not want to bury Caesar, but only to praise him. So let it be with Caesar. So let it be with Caesar. Julius Caesar quotes with modern English translations: Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. The noble Brutus Hath told you Caesar was ambitious: If it were so, it was a grievous fault, And grievously hath Caesar answer'd it. As much as he wished Caesar were not assassinated, he had no choice. Octavius had not been formally announced into public life, which at the time will give you your first military command. And Brutus is an honourable man. Read the ‘Friends, Romans, countrymen’ Julius Caesar monologue below with a modern English translation & analysis: Spoken by Marc Antony, Julius Caesar, Act 3 Scene 2. Mark Antony delivers a eulogy in honour of the recently murdered Julius Caesar: Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. The noble Brutus Hath told you Caesar was ambitious. So let it be with Caesar. And grievously hath Caesar answer'd it.

I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. And Brutus is an honourable man. The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interrèd with their bones.

Come I to speak in Caesar's funeral.

So let it be with Caesar. The evil that men do live after them. The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interrèd with their bones. "Men at sometimes are masters of their fates. Read the ‘Friends, Romans, countrymen’ Julius Caesar monologue below with a modern English translation & analysis: Spoken by Marc Antony, Julius Caesar, Act 3 Scene 2. Hath told you Caesar was ambitious: 7. The noble Brutus, The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interred with their bones; So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus 6. "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him." Nothing, not even conspirators, could thwart the praise due his beloved friend. Read the passage. The fault clear Brutus is not in our store but in ourselves, that we are underlings." I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.

By William Shakespeare. The noble Brutus. I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. If it were so, it was a grievous fault, 8. The noble Brutus Hath told you Caesar was ambitious. (Act 3, Scene 2 I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. So let it be with Caesar.

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